Wifi Router vs Modem: What They Do?

When it is time to prepare a home Wi-Fi system, it is important that you know what sort of equipment you require. Everything begins with two pieces of equipment: a modem which brings internet and a router which directs that connection to all of the computers, tablets, cellular phones and other devices you have available. […]

When it is time to prepare a home Wi-Fi system, it is important that you know what sort of equipment you require. Everything begins with two pieces of equipment: a modem which brings internet and a router which directs that connection to all of the computers, tablets, cellular phones and other devices you have available. Both devices work together to fill your home with cat videos, Snapchats and all the things which produce the web wonderful.

Here’s a rundown of the two kinds of gear, including what to look for and you’re usually better off choosing a Wifi Router vs. Modem.

what is a modem vs router : Your gateway to the Online

To bring the internet in your home, you’re likely to need a modem.

This is a small device that connects to your internet service provider (ISP) to tap into all that net goodness. The connection is made using a cable (for fiber or cable net) or telephone line (DSL) from out of your home that adheres to the back of your modem. Your modem shares this link with a computer or a router through an Ethernet cable.

Modems are solutions; the type is dependent upon the sort of service you get. If that’s DSL, you will need a DSL modem. If your ISP provides cable internet, you will want a cable modem. If you select fiber, you’ll find an optical network terminal (ONT) to interpret the fiber-optic light signals into electrical signals that your devices can recognize, and possibly another modem-like device to interpret from the ONT.

You are much better off buying your modem, which will run you if you’re planning to keep the online service for at least a year. With your ISP to be certain that works with the service of that provider. If you get cable internet, check out our recommendations for the best cable modem accessible.

Routers: Taking the net wirelessly

Picking on a modem is half the battle since they typically provide connections for a single, wired device. You are going to need a router, which is a device that lets you share the internet connection with your devices of your modem if you wish to go wireless. Routers connect to your modem via an Ethernet cable and pass that internet connection on either via an Ethernet cable or over a Wi-Fi system.

Routers come in two variants: standard routers and whole-home Wi-Fi routers which use devices to create a mesh network that extends your Wi-Fi sign. For smaller homes, single-unit routers offer a great enough signal to give a wireless connection to all corners of your home. (And if they don’t, you can always get a Wi-Fi extender.)

For larger homes, whole-home Wi-Fi mesh networks would be the better choice. These mesh routers replace one router with multiple Wi-Fi points (called nodes). Placed strategically throughout your home, they connect seamlessly to blanket you’re home without any speed loss or policy dead zones, with coverage.

Much like cable modems, we have looked at all sorts of routers and can recommend the ideal router for your home, with selections based on total performance, range, cost and how well the router manages online gaming.

Modem-Routers: Not the best of both worlds

Many ISPs and media device makers provide combination devices that serve as modems and routers. You’ve just got to make room for a single multitasker device instead of two pieces of gear performing functions that are different. But your network will be far better if you use a separate modem and router.

In modem technology, advances in router technology happen with the growing focus on connections. One such improvement is “multiple multiuser input, multiple output,” or MU-MIMO, technology for Wi-Fi, a technology utilized in super fast (802.11ac) networks that may direct separate streams of bandwidth to as many as four different devices simultaneously, without losing bandwidth.

Having another modem and router enables you to upgrade each device often so that you can have the routers with the latest technology, giving the fastest network to you.

Separate devices make it more convenient to troubleshoot when something goes wrong. If your router is fine and the modem is on the fritz (which is typically the case, in my experience), it’s a lot easier to get a new modem. You can just plug it in and return online when replacing only the modem.

If you are replacing a combination device, not only do you need to plug it in, but you also need to reconfigure your system to return to the way you like it and get your devices reconnected.